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Fish Farms, Alexandra Morton, Magic, Heroes and Saving The Environment  

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Gary Fletcher
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17/12/2018 12:12 pm  

I've been roughly following the fish farm issue for about 20 years now (Hint: I'm against them). I think many of you will enjoy this interview with Alexandra Morton:

https://thegreeninterview.com/wp-content/uploads/morton-alexandra-the-green-interview-transcript.pdf

He walks without purpose to an uncertain fate


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ventboys
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17/12/2018 1:26 pm  

Can you explain the issue, Gary, so I'll know what I'm reading about?

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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Gary Fletcher
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17/12/2018 4:01 pm  

Open net fish farms are destructive to the environment; Alexandra Morton slowly became aware of this. She has fought to eliminate or at least mitigate the problem for decades. The interview helps tell her story, her journey, her experience dealing with government and people.

There's great stuff here about the environment, about the interdependence of biological systems, about the effect of corporate thinking, about how animals communicate and how we, as animals, communicate, and how that affects how groups (including government organizations) think. 

Terry, I remember you writing that most people in government are good people, even if they seem to be doing bad things. Some of this touches on that, too. Of course there are some really bad people, people who are simply selfish and hateful, but most of us like to think we are well meaning. We just have a great capacity for self deception, or for rationalizing our behaviour.

I do hope you read it. I don't want to presume on your take, here; maybe you won't like it. I don't know. 

Oddly enough, despite how scary the whole business is, I'm less angry and more optimistic than I was yesterday as a result of reading this. I mean...the situation is dire, but Alexandra Morton isn't the only hero out there. Most of us are heroes, even if, like me, they only hope to articulate good opinions. We the people...yes, we the people can find it in us to live in ecological harmony rather than be a cancer on the world.

He walks without purpose to an uncertain fate


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ventboys
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19/12/2018 9:58 am  

I don't have any deep insights to contribute, but I have a couple of things worth sharing, I think.

I took an environmental science class during the community college phase of my recent degree. I wish I still had the online textbook; I think I still have access to read it, but I lost the link and I don't remember what it was called. It included quite a bit of content that relates to salmon ecosystems.

A video link from the textbook showed an inland ecosystem, a spawning site in central Idaho (I think) where the salmon had virtually stopped showing up. A local rancher was interviewed about the lack of salmon, and he said (from memory, not a quote), 'We miss the shit more than anything else."

What he meant (again, this is all from memory) was that the salmon fed the bears, who shit in the woods. Without the salmon the bears stopped showing up, and the woods were ... well, not scared, but shitless. Trees and berries didn't grow like they used to, and -- to her point about the nitrogen -- the soil deteriorated. Farm and ranch land didn't grow like before, affecting crops and cattle.

The second thing is just a random thought:

What if solar power can replace hydroelectric power? If that happens -- and I think it will -- can we remove all the dammed dams, and allow the rivers to restore themselves to whatever new version of a natural state they choose?

The question there is the same as the question we face with tar sands, fracking and other environmental rapes and physical assaults inflicted by our current, pussy-grabbing administration. "Will the regressive fuckers allow it?"

Morton is impressive. She has a somewhat simplistic view of the subject compared to, say, a PHD in zoology or biology, one of the -olgies, but she has a sharp, logical and naturally quotable way of thinking. 

  • "I turns out everybody needs the same thing" (talking about overproduction of farm salmon and how it damages ecosystems and stock options at the same time. The same thing is fewer farm salmon.)
  • “The natural world wants everything to work in concert. And ecosystems are not lovely things—they're fierce.”

  • "We're going to leave ourselves with nothing." (She was talking abou the natural cycle -- how salmon swim to meet the rain in watersheds -- and how farmed salmon break the natural laws and interfere with the cycle.)
  • “And sea lice, they don't actually want to kill the salmon they're on. That's their whole planet.”

My personal take? Remove the fucking dams, and stop sucking the lifeblood out of the earth like there are no consequences. Back when I was young there were three billion people; we are up to 7.2 billion now. If we follow that pace for the next 50 years, we'll have over 20 billion people.

The earth might be able to support 20 billion people, but it's one of those "don't try this at home" things. More likely, by then there will be either a massive pandemic (ebola or some flu strain, maybe, or simply a superbug that eats antibiotics for fun), famine and/or world war.

We absolutely cannot afford another round of stupid people running things.

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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Gary Fletcher
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19/12/2018 1:17 pm  

Thanks. Good and interesting observations. I especially agreed and appreciated her thought (which you also quoted) about how ecosystems are 'fierce' and force all of the living things to ultimately stay within their own niche.

Humans have their own niche, of course, and can occupy it and even carve it out so long as we are not overly aggressive. Otherwise we are a cancer - cancer, as in unrestrained aggressive growth. 

How, then, do we accomplish this? It will involve a massive shift in belief, from believing in a growth based economy to a steady state economy, where the death rate matches the birth rate (in fact, it should exceed the birth rate for a while). The economy ultimately must look more like a barter / trade system than one in which profit is the goal.

I think it is possible; I don't think it is going to be anything like easy. It may be impossible. I think it would be preferable to a global ecosystem collapse and massive species extinction. And what with human beings representing more and more of the living mass, that species extinction will end up as a lot of pain for all of us. Oh, it may not represent complete extinction. But dropping from 8 billion to 2 billion in the next 50 years...yeah, that's gonna mean a whole lot of suffering.

He walks without purpose to an uncertain fate


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ventboys
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19/12/2018 3:18 pm  

I think we can accomplish population control, simply by providing morning-after birth control to those who (1) want it or (2) have asked for government assistance to help raise a previous child. 

Anyone who wants babies should be able to have them, but we have to end the practice of either compelling or allowing people to raise  children who cannot afford to take care of them. 

Like just about everything else, the Idiocracy is actively against the logical solutions to population control. Planned Parenthood could go worldwide and take care of this issue without more than token government assistance, a pittance in taxes compared to your average welfare state.

And, in the long run, it would cut welfare down to actual handicapped people (and effective fakers, but that's part of the cost of a free society). Raising children should be expensive enough to give pause for people not married and prepared to committ to raising children -- and birth control, even after the fact, should be freely available to those who do not wish to undertake the expense and committment.

I don't like zero-population programs or rules for limiting family sizes. They really aren't necessary as long as we don't suborn families on the public dole, and the abridging of freedom is a cure worse than the disease, like surrendering to the fucking Germans in 1940 rather than deal with the death and misery of WWII. 

 

 

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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