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Gary Fletcher
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20/01/2019 10:59 am  

I don't find any of this even remotely radical:

socialist-utopia-2050-what-could-life-in-australia-be-like-after-the-failure-of-capitalism

The only quibble I would have is that the article assumes continued population growth. In my opinion, that can't continue.

He walks without purpose to an uncertain fate


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ventboys
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20/01/2019 4:11 pm  

At this point, I might as well be a socialist. Capitalists are such pricks. And just stupid as a log rolling down a hill into a sawmill. 

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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ventboys
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22/01/2019 9:52 am  

These guys seem fun. I need to listen to a podcast to see if there is any merit to their madness, or if it's just a bunch of masturbation. I mean, they use that word a lot. 

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/persons-of-interest/what-will-become-of-the-dirtbag-left

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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ventboys
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22/01/2019 9:56 am  

FiveThirtyEight posted this article this morning. It's where I found the Dirtbags. 

https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-young-lefts-anti-capitalist-manifesto/

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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Gary Fletcher
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22/01/2019 11:39 am  

Amusing article, amusing people. 

They're assholes, of course. For some reason, while reading the first couple paragraphs, I envisioned a cartoon of a guy being guillotined and as the blade descends there's a thought bubble of the guy thinking, "God damn it." I think this is funny because it's a clear understatement. 

He walks without purpose to an uncertain fate


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Gary Fletcher
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22/01/2019 12:04 pm  

That's a real good article, Terry. Thanks. Lots of interesting ideas...fresh ideas, well articulated. Of course everything has to go into the oven and we'll see how much comes out that is digestible. I'm very much impressed by Krugman and he's probably the least radical person of note in the article; but hey, I'm most easily characterized as a democratic socialist, so...no wonder.

He walks without purpose to an uncertain fate


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ventboys
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22/01/2019 1:11 pm  

Your comment, the "god damn it" thing, that made me laugh out loud. For some reason I thought of Bart Simpson. "God damn it."

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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ventboys
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22/01/2019 1:20 pm  

The fat kid strikes me as very Bannon-ish in his manner. Bannon has the Nazi thing (obviously not the same), but take the xeonpobic hate out of the equation and they have a lot  in common. 

I don't equate them with the racist right, of course, but I absolutely see them as something to be skeptical about. Every hardcore partisan view has the same weakness -- a lack of awareness of alternate theories. It's just incredibly easy, even for intelligent people, to get swallowed up by the White Whale of their own agenda. 

For now, I say let 'em fly. But don't forget that Obama once said that about ISIS, and I agreed with him at the time. ISIS began as  putative radicals bent on building an independent Islamic state. The beheadings and other atrocities came later.

So let's not rubber stamp this group with our confirmation bias and ethnosympathy until we are sure they aren't just 2018's version of the Arab Spring. Or the Russian Revolution. Or Mao, or Hitler, or any other highly partisan movement. 

The key word, and I emphasize this because it's so important, is never the ideology. It's radical. Anything radical is risky. And those of us observing it should recognize that there is little difference between penicillin and the Ebola virus to the naked eye. 

So good luck to 'em, and I think it'll be fun to see how they develop. But recognize them for what they are, not what you want them to be. Just a word of caution to my boutique liberal friend 🙂

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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Gary Fletcher
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22/01/2019 2:13 pm  
Posted by: ventboys

But recognize them for what they are, not what you want them to be. Just a word of caution to my boutique liberal friend 🙂

Whozzat?

I'm not on their side, anyway. I'm just on the side of what pleases me. 

I was idly thinking...Commitment to standard right wing thinking is a desire to to return to an imaginary past. Commitment to standard left wing thinking is a desire to march forward to an imaginary future. 

Both sides are guilty of romanticizing their beliefs. Conservatives want to live in a combination Horatio Alger / Louis L'Amour world. Progressives want to live in some idealized utopia, and the conflict between the two plays out like the 1920s movie "Metropolis." The movie is sympathetic to socialist views, but carries with it the seeds of doubt. It's an unresolved conflict - we, each of us, secretly desires to be the masters of our own domains (heh-heh), but most of us are restrained by guilt.

I'm rambling.

He walks without purpose to an uncertain fate


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ventboys
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22/01/2019 2:31 pm  

I think the key in that equation is that you see progressive as synonymous with progression and regressive as synonymous with regression. I don't think that's quite right, and the difference matters.

I have been almost obsessively pro-progressive in some cases (Teddy Roosevelt comes to mind) and obsessively anti-progressive (Lyndon Johnson comes to mind). I have been almost obsessively pro-regressive (Gramm-Rudman comes to mind) and .. well, you know what I mean when I say I was against the South in the Civil War.

It's the blanket thought process itself that gets us in trouble. I know your brain doesn't get interested in the distinctions, and I don't think it has to. But I hope you recognize that there is a difference between swinging from a trapeze and jumping off a building. Both feel like flying, but one is risky while the other just foolhardy.

Somewhere in between the two -- willful swinging and lemming-like leaping -- is where we have to accept is about the best combination of safety and freedom. The trapeze has no freedom, and the jump has no safety. As much as I value freedom -- and I do value freedom above all else -- the world ain't going to accept my Unabomber existence as the norm.

For one thing, it can't. I'm 56 and I have not spent a dime on health care, ever. I was at home, then I was healthy, then I was in the military, then I was healthy. The only healthcare I ever spent money on was in the Navy as part of my implied benefits package. I got away with it, and still get away with it as of this afternoon, because the only health crisises I have had were as a small child (stitches in my ear when my brother ran over me with a bike) and in the service (lost 50 pounds in two weeks from a throat infection exacerbated by a fucking Lt. who made me work 14-hour days on cold, flooded decks with strep throat). 

I have not had a haircut in something like 15 years, either, and only a few since I left the Navy. That's just me being cheap and not being willing to sit in waiting rooms, but it's part of my freedom ethos. I have never drawn food stamps, even though I was qualified for them most of my adult life, and I only drew unemployment a couple of times, even though I qualified for that several times, too. 

Most people can't do that. I bought a house while working part-time, and I pay my mortgage and my student loans now working less than fulltime. I get away with it because I'm the cheapest bastard on the planet. My mortgage is under 500 bucks a month, and I haven't had a car payment since 1992, either. I don't eat out, I don't go to movies, I don't drink or smoke, and I don't but name brand anything. 

Most people can't do that. It's a lifestyle of sorts, but not one that would work while raising a family (I gave up all the extras when my kid was a teenager and I had my hours cut) or if you have health issues. 

So I don't need the trapeze, but at the same time I can't just jump, either. I quit drinking and smoking to get healthy, every bit as much as to cut costs. I exercise -- mostly walking -- to keep my body from getting to sedentary with all the reading and writing I do. My pure jump would not include being health-conscious (looking down) or cost-conscious (also looking down). So I look before I leap. But I don't use the trapeze, so to speak.

This analogy is out of hand. I'm going to get more coffee (is that a trapeze? It sure as hell is). 

Curmudgeon would be a great name for a newly discovered species of crab.


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Gary Fletcher
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22/01/2019 5:53 pm  

Well, I fully realize that left and right are just political labels for a chinese menu of policy positions and characterizations (such as I made in my last post). Truth is that everybody holds views on things along a spectrum...a smorgasbord where you pick some items from the left side and the right side of the menu. Only a few people end up liking only one side.

I'm a spiritual conservative to a significant extent...like to do my own thing and be left alone to do it. But I'm also pleased by acceptance, at least by a small tribe (I just like to be able to get away from the gang, too). My realistic side is that it's an overcrowded planet, people wise, and we can't really survive without some kind of socialistic structure...that's where democracy needs to step in and make sure that no matter what kind of socialism we end up with (and even capitalism is form of socialism...granted one that favours the rich) is held back from tyranny.

I'll end by repeating an old Isaac Asimov recollection. His first wife once said to him, "I wish we lived 100 years ago when it was easier to get good servants." He replied that it would be terrible. She asked why. He said, "Because we'd be the servants."

 

 

He walks without purpose to an uncertain fate


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